Strengthening your Faith

04-29-2018Question of the Week

Reading I: Acts 9:26-31 - Saul visits Jerusalem
Reading II: 1 John 3:18-24 - The actions of believers
Gospel: John 15:1-8 - The vine and the branches
Key Passage: [The vine grower] removes every branch in me that bears no fruit. Every branch that bears fruit he prunes to make it bear more fruit. (John 15:2)

Adult: When have you been "pruned" by your experiences in a way that led to greater abundance?

Child: When have you felt stronger or better because you did something hard to help another person?

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First Communion Dress

04-29-2018Liturgy CornerFr. Paul Turner © 2002 Resource Publications, Inc.

Girls sharing communion for the first time traditionally wear a white dress and veil. But the tradition is fairly recent, and the garment is not required. The origins of this custom are not clear. References to white first communion dresses appear in the 18th century. At that time children shared communion for the first time around age 10 to 12 or even older. Several interpretations of the dress emerged: It was the dress of angels who worshiped at God's throne. It imitated the garb of those serving in a royal court. It recalled the baptismal garment. And, of course, it resembles a wedding dress.

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Remaim in Me and you will bear much fruit

04-29-2018Weekly ReflectionsWe Celebrate Worship Resource, Vol. 43, No. 2

“Remain in me,” Jesus tells his disciples repeatedly in the Gospel, and you “will bear much fruit” (John 15:4-5). He is the vine; his disciples, the branches. The vine and the branches work together to extend and expand over a large area and to bear fruit in abundance. All this is done under the guidance of the vine grower, God the Father, who prunes the vine to increase the amount of fruit it will bear. What a rich metaphor! But none of this will happen unless we remain in Jesus as Jesus remains in us. John explores this further in his first letter: “Those who keep his commandments remain in him, and he in them” (1 John 3:24). This is how we bear fruit. When we love God and one another by showing that love through our actions “in deed and in truth,” Jesus remains in us and we in him (1 John 3:18). A wonderful example of this is found in the work of Saint Paul, still called Saul in the first reading. His work to build up the Church in the Gentile world has borne fruit now for two thousands years.

How can you bear fruit, and in so doing, witness to the presence of Jesus?

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Eucharistic Prayer Choice

04-22-2018Liturgy CornerFr. Paul Turner © 2004 Resource Publications, Inc.

The Eucharistic prayers used at Mass are in four categories. The first group, simply numbered one through four, contains the principal prayers for Mass throughout the liturgical year. A second group is used for Masses of reconciliation. The two prayers of this group were originally composed for the holy year 1975 when Paul VI was pope, but they have been approved for general use, especially in penitential seasons and days when the Scriptures invited us to reconcile.

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Called to be Shepherds

04-22-2018Question of the Week
  • Reading I: Acts 4:8-12 - The stone that has become the cornerstone
  • Reading II: 1 John 3:1-2 - Recognizing the Son
  • Gospel: John 10:11-18 - The Good Shepherd
  • Key Passage: Jesus said, "I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep." (John 10:11)

Adult: Whom are you shepherding in your life right now, and who shepherds you?

Child: Who has been like a shepherd to you by their example? For whom could you be a shepherd?

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I am the Good Shepherd

04-22-2018Weekly ReflectionsWe Celebrate Worship Resource, Vol. 43, No. 2

From the stone that the builders rejected to the parable of the Good Shepherd, we hear some very familiar passages from scripture today. Peter starts us off, testifying before the Sanhedrin regarding a cure he performed the previous day. He tells the authorities that it was actually Jesus Christ who effected the cure; Peter was merely acting in his name. He turns the tables on the authorities: the one you condemned to death was raised from the dead and continues to bring life and healing to those who believe. Peter cites Psalm 118, which we sing today: “The stone rejected by the builders has become the cornerstone” (Psalm 118:22). Jesus is the cornerstone, the foundation holding the building together. He is also the Good Shepherd, holding the flock together. When Jesus says in John’s Gospel, “I have other sheep that do not belong to this fold. These also I must lead,” he may be referring to Gentiles or other outsiders (John 10:16). But he also be referring to future generations of believers, including us. He knows us and lays down his life for us, just as he did for Peter and the other apostles.

How is Jesus the cornerstone of your life? How is he the Good Shepherd?

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Praying the Eucharistic Prayer

04-15-2018Liturgy CornerFr. Paul Turner © 2003 Resource Publications, Inc.

The Eucharistic prayer is the most important part of the Mass. It is also the demanding part. The Second Vatican Council invited the full, conscious, active participation of the people at Mass. During the Eucharistic prayer, the priest has almost all the words, but the assembly is not passive. Even here –especially here – in silence and acclamation, we offer full, conscious, active participation.

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The Living Christ

04-15-2018Question of the Week
  • Reading I: Acts 3:13-15, 17-19 - Peter's discourse on Jesus' resurrection
  • Reading II: 1 John 2:1-5a - Keeping the commandments
  • Gospel: Luke 24:35-48 - Jesus appears to the Eleven
  • Key Passage: Jesus said to them, "Why are you frightened, and why do doubts arise in your hearts? Look at my hands and my feet; see that it is I myself."
    (Luke 24:38–39)

Adult: What questions about Jesus still arise in the midst of your faith?

Child: What question would you like to ask someone about Jesus' appearance to the Apostles?

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FORGIVENESS leads to Conversion of the HEART

04-15-2018Weekly ReflectionsWe Celebrate Worship Resource, Vol. 43, No. 2

Appearing to the apostles after the Resurrection, Jesus reminded them that scripture said the Messiah would rise from the dead and that repentance would be preached in his name to all the nations. Jesus had fulfilled the first part. Now the apostles need to fulfill the second. One of the disciples in that room would have been Peter. Peter accepts this call and we hear him in the first reading admonishing the people of Jerusalem for denying Jesus in front of the authorities. How can he of all people say this, since he himself denied Jesus three times that fateful night? But Peter repented and has been forgiven. Now he wants to extend this forgiveness to the people. Consider that his audience may have included some who were actually part of that crowd on Good Friday. It may even have included one of the people who accused Peter of knowing Jesus. But Peter excuses them, for his purpose is to lead them to repent and be converted. We are all sinners, in need of repentance and conversion of heart. If God can raise Jesus from the dead, to which Peter and all the disciples can attest, then certainly God can redeem those who have sinned.

Can you forgive someone who has hurt you or someone you love?

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Witness through the Eyes of Faith

04-08-2018Weekly ReflectionsWe Celebrate Worship Resource, Vol. 43, No. 2

You may not have realized it last week, but Easter Gospel did not feature the risen Lord. Last week, the disciples were afraid and disturbed when they saw the empty tomb. They could not comprehend what had happened. They did not understand “rising from the dead.” The crucifixion they’d understood. They had witnessed it. But no one had seen the burial cloths thrown off. No one had seen the stone rolled away. No one had seen Jesus emerge. No one had seen the risen Christ. Until now. Now Jesus came into their midst, brought the Holy Spirit, and commissioned them to preach the Good News. Now, once again, they can be witnesses. Now their testimony can tell the whole story. The Messiah’s life did not end in an ignominious death. It did not end at all. Now they can testify that Jesus joined them whenever they gathered together. Now they can witness to the Holy Spirit, whom he’d promised before he died. This community of believers, once barricaded behind locked doors, has been transformed to one that grew as it preached the Good News and lived “of one heart and mind” (Acts 4:32).

Can you be a witness as well, through the eyes of faith?

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Following the Example of Jesus

04-08-2018Question of the Week
  • Reading I: Acts 4:32-35 - Life of the Christians
  • Reading II: 1 John 5:1-6 - Belief in Jesus Christ
  • Gospel: John 20:19-31 - Appearance to the disciples
  • Key Passage: Now the whole group of those who believed were of one heart and soul; no one claimed private ownership of any possessions; everything they owned was held in common. (Acts 4:32)

Adult: What could you do this week to inspire your family to resemble the early Christians more closely?

Child: What could you and your family do to help others who are in need?

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Baptismal Certificate

04-08-2018Liturgy CornerFr. Paul Turner © 2002 Resource Publications, Inc.

After you were baptized, your name was inscribed in the baptism register of the Catholic parish where the event took place. Your entry also includes the names of the minister, your parents (if you were a child when baptized), your godparents, the place and date of your baptism and the place and date of your birth. You or your family probably received a record of that entry in a document commonly called a baptismal certificate. The certificate is your copy of the official record held at your parish of baptism.

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Made New by Christ

04-01-2018Question of the Week
  • Reading I: Acts 10:34a, 37-43 - Peter's discourse
  • Reading II: Colossians 3:1-4 - Mystical death and resurrection
  • Gospel: John 20:1-9 - Peter and the disciple at the tomb
  • Key Passage: Clean out the old yeast so that you may be a new batch, as you really are unleavened. For our paschal lamb, Christ, has been sacrificed. (1 Corinthians 5:7)

Adult: What change could the hope of the resurrection of Christ inspire you to make?

Child: What bad habit would you like to "clear out" during the hopeful time of this Easter season?

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Alleluia! Alleluia! Alleluia!

04-01-2018Weekly ReflectionsWe Celebrate Worship Resource, Vol. 43, No. 2

Alleluia! He has risen. Alleluia! He has conquered death. Alleluia! He has brought salvation to the world. Alleluia! Alleluia! Alleluia! Today we welcome Alleluia! back to our vocabulary. We sing it, we shout it, we proclaim it. Throw open the doors and windows! This is too big to be contained. The veil of the sanctuary, torn in half when Jesus died on the cross, is a sign of this, for the sanctuary could no longer contain it. The stone that was rolled away from the entrance to the tomb is, too, for the tomb could not longer contain it. The new life that Jesus brought about through his death and resurrection is too great to be closed up. It needs to escape into that open, bursting forth for all to share. Last night, the Church around the world welcomed its newest members. Today we renew our own baptismal promises, recalling the day that we became members of the Church. As members of the Church, we are called to spread the Good News, as the apostles did after Jesus’ death and resurrection. We do not just shout and sing Alleluia! to ourselves. We celebrate the redemption Jesus won with everyone. Alleluia indeed!

How will you share this Easter joy today and throughout the year?

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Immersion

04-01-2018Liturgy CornerFr. Paul Turner © 2005 Resource Publications, Inc.

Baptism in the Catholic Church may be administered either by immersion or pouring. The two options are always listed in that order, indicating a preference for baptism by immersion, even though pouring is more commonly practiced.

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